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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too long, our presiding officer. anyway, senator merkley, i yield. mr. merkley: i think my colleague from new mexico is absolutely right in pointing out there were periods when the senate really worked to address the big issues facing america. and it wawnltd that there weren't -- wasn't that there weren't profound differences. there were fierce differences, emotional differences, deep differences but folks came to this floor, they conversed, they laid out their arguments and ultimately they made decisions about which way to go. and they didn't bring the attitude let's just paralyze this chamber from doing doing nothing. had they d
>> one of the first to cast the vote in israel's election. you're watching "al jazeera." we meet a boy who feels betrayed by the world. the u.n. intervenes in the south china seas. police officers in mexico say they have had enough. israelis are voting in their general election. binyamin netanyahu is a clear favorite to win another term in office. we're covering the election for us of there. is it shaping up? .> we're in west jerusalem there have been a steady trickle of voters coming and. sraelis are is re eligible to vote. it looks like to be a good turnout. the question is to what extend binyamin netanyahu can claim a mandate for victory. prime minister binyamin netanyahu casting his ballot. >> want them to succeed. >> he has a commanding lead in all polls. there are new kids on israel's political bloc. >> he is trying to make this campaign a personal campaign on his ability to be the prime minister. yes or no? specific questions about policies. >> the votes have been dominating the headlines. the likud party ran on a single ballad. have lost support to this man. they appealed
were reelected in the general election here in 2015, it would be part of their mandate and the platform that there would offer the british people and in-out referendum around 2018. so five years from now. the great concern of this, even if there is agreement in the european union, the great concern is that now a leading prime minister from a leading european country has said the sellout and other european countries might follow suit. the worry in big european capitals like paris and berlin is whether this will be criticized and if europe will only be as strong as its most skeptical parts. and the worry is that europe might start to collapse from the outside in words. so i don't think that they will take this speech very kindly one bit. i certainly don't think that they will want to acknowledge the kind of change that mr. chairman has said is necessary. >> israel's prime minister and his right-wing bloc has done worse than expected in parliamentary elections. benjamin netanyahu is coming victory. now he has to negotiate with other fiscal parties to form a broader coalition. >> i am proud
: the governor has really had the popularity ratings that have stalled ever since he has been elected into office. one of the latest things he has been doing is after his first term in which he spent some time really cutting the budget and balancing the budget, and that included reducing the education funding by $1.3 billion, he has turned a run and is now in the process of trying to win back some of his support, especially within the education community. he has recently come up with a proposal to get every full-time teacher in the state a $2,500 raise. that is one of the things he has been doing that is really going across the party line a little bit to try to reach out to teachers. host: how does florida have the money to pay for that? is there any push back? caller: the cost is estimated at $480 million. the governor has yet to give us his budget proposal. he will be releasing that this week. we will see where he plans to pay for it. there has been some push back from the legislature. republican lawmakers say that they do not oppose giving teachers a raise, but they would prefer to have focuse
inaugurated four days ago. >> right. >> and you're talking about elections four years from now. >> yeah, and i am, as you know, steve, i am still secretary of state so i am out of politics an i'm forbidden from even hearing these questions. >> as steve martin would tay mussily say, excuse me. they asked to come on "60 minutes." they like the press coverage they got today and last night. they love the fact we're talking about it. it seems to me for him to mock the very message when they are the message is a little weird on the part of the president. >> please, steve. did you see the body language on hillary. that's a woman who knows the presidency is basically hers for the taking if she wants it. who could stop her? she knows it. she's as relaxed as i have ever seen her. the best thing to do is step back, get out of this job, and spend the next three years preparing herself to run for president if she wants it. >> was this a move -- so many things in politics follow other things that wouldn't have happened if they didn't have that thing before them. do you think this was to give her a really ni
. >> this was an inaugural address where the president came out said i won the election and i'm going to be aggressive in the second term about pushing my agenda. >> and i think we had a clarifying moment and the president's speech put to rest, put to rest the idea that barack obama is a moderate. barack obama is a liberal. >> i don't think that absolutism, i'm sure the president would say the same, on the part of either party or any politician is helpful in terms of solving problems and obviously, if we're going to move forward we're going to have to find a way to come together to solve these problems. >> now dually reelected, he intends to pursue the course of that liberalism. he's going to pursue it as if he had from the election an enormous mandate. >> when i heard that was a liberal speech, i don't think it was a liberal speech, i think it's a popular speech. >> and the battle lines are clearly drawn and i don't think there's hope of-- barring unforeseen developments, that we'll have the unity that people in washington wished for so long. >> we believe strongly there are areas in common that we c
that we chiefs are buying this is because they were appointed by mayors who were elected who are telling them precisely what to do. urban centers -- if i may finish -- urban centers are a liberal bastion. that is not result in warm and fuzzy feelings for the second amendment. >> that is where we see the massacres occurring is in places where guns are banned. you look over the past 20 years all the shooting massacres would occur in places where guns were banned. the ultimate hypocrisy that there is 1800 cops guarding our congressmen on any given day that is why these tragedies are occurring. [talking over each other] [talking over each other] lou: i think we can agree with this. it's a lot more complicated than that. i would say to both sides, do not oversimplify and let's maintain at least some intellectual discussion. mental health in the and the treatment is a relevant issue that should be discussed. these shootings are far more the responsibility of people who are mentally ill and who have not received appropriate treatment than they are of guns. >> go down the list. [talking over eac
of it is to rebuild the middle class. i just don't see any social policies on the horizon -- the election is over. we have heard everything the candidates had to say. not one said anything intelligent about, this is how you rebuild the american middle class. so, little tiny book. not all that think. tells three stories. what doesn't work, and why it doesn't work, what does work, and why it does work, what could work and how to make it work. >> host: professor gelles, do you come at this from a liberal or conservative point of view? you mentioned fox news. >> guest: practical. i've worked in policy in washington. i've been a dean of the school of social policy. and i find that purple is my color. i'm not interested in taking an ideological point of view. i'm interest in results. and the danger of writing a book like this is -- i've already discovered it -- my extremely liberal friend wish i had never written the book and my extremely conservative friends which i didn't want to spend this much of the government money. if i can tick both sides off and be true to the data, then i've done the book i wante
there. >> one interpretation of the election is that fracking cost mitt romney the presenthe presi. it really did make a significant difference in what turned out to be swing states. >> it did. >> and not think oklahoma was in place. -- i do not think oklahoma was in place. [laughter] >> our company has doubled the size of our employment base there. we are not huge employers yet. 750 people. that is double what we were three years ago. >> one of the environmental challenges, people worry about what you put down the wells in fracking, but it is mostly water and sand. the problem is what comes up. there is naturally occurring radioactive material down there. there is our sncc, barry m.. -- arsenic, barium. in the early days they would turn the water over to the municipal water authorities, who would water it down until they got down to the legal toxicity levels, and then dump it. the problem was, what do we do with all this waste water. they have decided, let's not a bit. they figured out ways to fill the water -- dum pit. they figured out ways to filter the water. >> that was someth
as conservatives to look at the november election and that exhult -- exultant, unabashed embrace of the left and to have a moment's despair. let me say this room is critical to preventing that to happen. "national review" has a lornings -- long, long history of standing athwart history and yelling "halt." we can stop this. we can turn it around and in fact i am right now incredibly, incredibly optimistic, as they say, it's always darkest before the dawn, that we are on the verge of a rebirth of conservativism. [applause] so what do we do? how do we make that happen? let me talk at two different levels. short-term and long term. short term let's talk about tactics on the ground. in washington, d.c. we have a president who's feeling his oats. he's reading his press releases and believes he is unstoppable. we have a democratic senate that are feeling their oats. they've read the kool-aid. let me give three bits of advice. and by the way, read the kool-aid would be just mangling, reading the press releases, drinking the kool-aid -- if they read the kool-aid it doesn't work nearly as well -- [lau
president being re-elected, having a second inauguration today? >> i believe that he would have been very happy to know that america has moved to a place that they are able to elect a president, not based on the color of his skin, but as he talked about, the content of his character. and that, he would be very happy about. i think the state of where we are, divided on so many different things, unfortunately, that's unacceptable. we must become united, united states of america, but i think the majority of the people are saying, listen, let's do away with these old habits, these old things that need to be dead and gone, and move on to really bringing our nation together. and i think he would say that. time to move on and make it better and get it right. >> well, i'm very excited about tonight. looking forward to your performance. and if you do need me, i will be in close proximity and available. >> start warming up. warm up, mate. >> all right, buddy. >> good to see you. >> good to see you, take care. >> i tell you what, stevie wonder has a very good english accent. he had it right down to
against it and see it as extremely counterproductive. my hope is that, you know, there were just elections yesterday. we don't know what kind of government will be formed or where they will go, but my prayer is that perhaps this can be a moment where we can renew some kind of effort to get the parties into a discussion to have a different track than we have been on over the course of the last couple of years. and i would like to reserve all of the capacity to be able to do that, so i'm just going to stop with what i've said, but unilateral efforts are not helpful. we oppose them coming and we -- i don't think symbolic or other kinds of efforts are what we need. we need real negotiation, we need real results, we need progress. saxby three. two weeks ago some of us returned from afghanistan seeing the operations there. you described well i think in your opening statement about the progress being made to the afghan security forces to take over. if we take back and look at iraq for a minute, some of us traveled there in a couple of years before that conflict ended, and we saw some of the build
with the election of abi who wants to finally get japan out of what's close to two decades of what you might call a lost period of time. and he's come forth, as you know, with this new stimulus package which is equivalent to 116 billion u.s., 10 trillion yen, 2.2% of gdp. a lot of that would go for infrastructure, a lot to the north for earthquake area. but, of course, we've seen 14 such packages since the late 1990s. and this one has to be different. and also he's pressing the bank of japan. of last time i was here was to -- last time i was here was to introduce governor shirakawa several years ago who i think is a very good governor of one of the major central banks in the world, pressing him to put in more monetary stimulus which i think is necessary. but i, one of the points that was made right in this room several years ago by the governor, and i've been with him three times in the last two months, is, you know, monetary and fiscal stimulus aren't enough. in the case of japan, you need major deregulation. i think major structural reforms, deregulation in the service area. so hopefully that'l
. >> the results are respected soon from jordon's parliamentary election. jordon's parliament will have new powers, including the right to choose the next prime minister. tens of thousands of people -- is really hot political newcomer offers hopes that the coalition will succeed. -- the israeli political newcomer hopes the coalition will succeed. there will not be a "blocking majority" that will prevent them from forming a government. the pakistan community feels they're being unfairly punished for their beliefs following a graveyard attack. a man tied up a guard and 21 others before smashing more than 100 gravestones. >> the difference between the two halves of this one graveyard is plain to see. one side is neat and orderly, the other smashed to pieces. on december 3 at around one dozen men stormed the cemetery in the middle of the night. armed with guns, pickaxes, and sledgehammers, they set upon these graves, determined to destroy tombstones inscribed with koranic verse is. most are regarded as heretics because they believe there was a profit after muhammad. many frown on muslim prayers and ep
overseas trips that he made in 28 years on foreign relations committee, his work to ensure free elections in the philippines, his work with aids in africa, his work as chairman of the new start treaty and his very public and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sedan. -- sudan. historians will be judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy at much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i want to ask john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to eject. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he has been to egypt and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator has -- it is what we d
's so problematic, and i think this election told us a story that we are not going to put up with that. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >>> welcome. l
to that u.s. for training. there were some who led the military coup, which overthrew the elected government. that is worrisome for us. we asked ourselves questions. did we miss the signs that this was happening? was there anything that we did in our training that was -- that could have been done differently and caused a different outcome? i think that the answer is a little bit of both. as we look at this from a purely military standpoint, we were focusing our training almost exclusively on tactical or technical matters. how to operate various pieces of equipment and how to improve effectiveness or tactical operations and the like. i see that there kernel is a paratrooper. -- colonel is a paratrooper. all of those things are very good. we did spend the requisite time focusing on values, ethics, and a military egos that says -- e cos that says when you put on aim u of the nation, you accept responsibility to defend and th protect that nation and abide by the legitimate authority that has been established duri an conductor sells to the rule of law and to see yourself as servants of people of
after the last election will not oppose it any longer. joining us now, manhattan institute fellow, city journal contributing editor to matter it -- heather macdonald. outright amnesty. those used to be fighting words in this country. they are no longer such? >> well, it is called probationary status, which is a euphemism for amnesty. immediately grants probationary status to the illegal aliens in the country, which grants them the right to be here until some future point. basically it's functional legalization. lou: as we believe, just about every one of those senators use the expression defacto amnesty. because of what is happening in this country in various states illegally year get mortgages in many states and originate with a lot of banking institutions, major institutions. it is the fact no amnesty. it is a reality that is being recognized, apparently now by both parties. lou: that is an interesting point, and it undercuts the notion that illegal aliens living in the shadows. in fact, this is not so onerous of conditions. a problem with official amnesty is the moral hazard problem.
stick. >> what about spending cuts? >> we've heard so much about it during the presidential election and now that the president has been gnawiinaugurd for the second term. how much leverage do the republicans have. and the president didn't touch on either of those thing in his inaugural address. >> he made clear in his inaugural address he was not, the cuts in medicare and social security, and newest entitlement, middle class health insurance entitlement. he made it clear he doesn't want to do that and that's where the republicans want to go, because those are, and this is agreed and the president use today point this out the biggest drivers of deficits and debt. he's drawing a line he's not going to go there. republicans will be-hard pressed to go there, but at least in their point of view, hold on the line of spending and not go up as much as it was supposed to. >> and chris, you mentioned this only lasts until may 18th. is that what we can expect now days from our lawmakers, forever of the kicking of the can down the field and do we only-- the best we can hope for is a three-month
two weeks before this backroom betrayal of the public trust by elected officials and the mercenaries they have mentored, amgen pleaded guilty to fraud. fraud, look it up. trickery, cheating, duplicity. amgen agreed to pay $762 million in criminal and civil penalties. the company had been caught illegally marketing another one of its drugs. the fact that their puppet master had been the subject of fines and a massive federal investigation mattered not to its servile pawns in the senate, where pomp and circumstance are but masks for the brute power of money. with me now is congressman peter welch, democrat from vermont. he has just introduced bipartisan legislation to repeal that half-billion-dollar giveaway to amgen. we asked one of its co-sponsors, republican richard hanna of new york, to join us, but a previous commitment made it impossible for him to do so. congressman welch, welcome. >> thank you. >> what is it you're actually trying to do? >> well, there's two things. one, i want to get the taxpayers their money back. this is half a billion dollars, more than that, that is vintag
and democracy sometimes you win elections sometimes you lose elections. i work very hard but i lost and then president obama asked me to be secretary of state and i said yes. >> clinton's last day as secretary of state is this friday february 1st. >> the deep freeze across the country is turning more dangerous as the winter storm hits the midwest hard. in eastern iowa the ice is coating roads sending dozens of cars right off. >> in wisconsin you can see the thick snow is falling making it hard for drivers to see and navigate the streets. let's check in with maria molina. she is tracking the storm as it moves east. >> the storm not over with just yet heading out over the northeast. already producing snow across pennsylvania and new york. even freezing rain across mid atlantic early this morning expecting it to be producing travel headaches. there is a little bit of warm air behind it. you will be seeing above that winter weather over to rains across most of the northeast including places like new york city and philadelphia and mid atlantic. we have winter weather advisories in effect
and a number of senators as well. and to ask him directly about the elections and ask him about my second question. but i wanted to get your sense of where you see those lexes going. what efforts you can undertake to make sure that they are free and fair because they've been, i think, central to the next chapter in this transition. i just wanted to comment on that. the second question as it relates to afghanistan is one that senator boxer raised and her work on this has been exemplary, on women and girls and in particular, i have a -- an amendment that we got through the national defense authorization act which would require both state and defense to file a report on the efforts to promote the security of afghan women and girls just by way of itemization monitoring and responding to changes in women's security that will be part of the report. secondly, improving gender sensitivity and responsiveness among the afghan security forces and increasing the recruitment and retention of women in the afghan security forces. so both with regard to the election and women and girls. >> senator with r
. it will be an in-out referendum. legislation will be drafted a for the next election. and if a conservative government is elected, we'll introduce the enabling legislation immediately and pacify the end of that year. and we will complete this negotiation and hold this referendum within the first half of the next parliament. it is time for the british people to have their say. it is time for us to settle this question about britain and europe. now, i say to the british people, this will be your decision. and when the choice comes, you will have an important choice to make about our country's desti destiny. now, i understand the appeal of going it alone, of charting our own course. but it will be a decision we will have to take with cool heads. proponents on both sides of the argument when he to avoid exaggerating their claims. of course britain could make her own way in the world, outside the eu, if we chose to do so. so could any other member state. but the question will have to ask ourselves is this, is that the very best future for our country? we will have to wait carefully where true na
if the election were held today, and that was the only way we could survive hearing that that many times and i said if my aunt had a [ censor bleep ] she would be my uncle. jim here is a fun fact for you. >> yes? >> stephanie: the historic warner theater. and i was reading kirk douglas' book on the plane, and spartacus opened at the warner theater. >> oh wow. >> kind of a random book to read on a plane. >> stephanie: listen kirk douglas watches and think i'm [ inaudible ]. >> okay. >> stephanie: and he signed the book to me and he said -- >> i'm spartacus. >> stephanie: he thinks i'm beautiful and then when david told him i'm gay he said what! [♪ dramatic music ♪] >> stephanie: he signed my book to a beautiful girl who is also smart. >> okay. >> stephanie: i think it was one anecdote about the warner theater. >> very cool. >> stephanie: also here is another fun fact. alan grayson who was our celebrity on panel. he got a standing ovation for walking and sitting when he was in the theater, so did jfk. and the guy he was with said they are applauding you even in the dark. >
she isn't planning to run in the 20-16 presidential election. but that isn't stopping supporters from hoping she does. senator dianne feinstein of california told c-n-n's state of the union. she's firmly in that camp. >> "i'm not concerned with that as i am with what secretary clinton is thinking about 2016. i think she's accomplished an incredible record and really has unbridled popularity, she has a total knowledge of all of the issues. served in the senate. she has been first lady -" >> crowley: you want her to run? would run." >> senator barbara boxer echoed that sentiment during last week's congressional hearings on the benghazi attack. she told clinton she will be missed, but hopefully not for long. both democratic and republican lawmakers took to morning talk shows today proclaiming the need for the g-o-p to tackle immigration reform. this comes after the republican party's poor showing among latino voters in the presidential election. former presidential candidate and current arizona senator john mccain had this to say. >> what's changed is honestly is that there is a new, i t
the president get elected because despite our hard-fought primary, we had such agreement on what needed to be done for our country. >> it made for tough debates. we could never figure out what we differed on. >> we worked at that pretty hard. >> i consider hillary a strong friend. >> very warm, close. i think there's a sense of understanding that sometimes doesn't even take words, because we have similar views. we have similar experiences that i think provide a bond that may seem unlikely to some but has been really at the core of our relationship over the last four years. >> i have to ask you, what's the date of expiration on this endorsement? >>gretchen: oh, steve. >>steve: i have to ask that question. you're sitting here together. everybody in town is talking about it already. and this is taking place. >> you know, steve, i've got to tell you, you guys in the press are incorrigible. i was literally inaugurated four days ago, and you're talking about elections four years from now. >> there could have been so many other tougher questions. this really was just, i think, a venue for pres
supported president obama in his re-election this year. so many hispanic americans came out for him. why do you that i happened? >> well, it's very easy. you know, obama and the democrats have the best option for the latinos. immigration reform is on the table. the dream act. so, you know, the latinos here in the united states are so powerful and their voice needs to be heard. they need to be treated as first class citizens. >> reporter: in addition to celebrities, campaign volunteers came from around the country. kelly jacobs traveled from mississippi, literally, wearing her support. how many sequins are on your dress? >> 4,000 total. >> reporter: and these are all done by hand? >> they're antique shield sequ n sequi sequins. >> reporter: a lot of work behind them and ahead if they are to help president obama deliver in the second term. but tonight, it was just time for a good party. >> it looks like a good party. brianna keilar, thank you. >> everyone talking about the jason wu dress. >> twice. >> twice in a row. all right. moving on to some other news. it is the testimony that many ameri
minutes past the hour, i am patty and brown with your fox news minute. then yahoo! called early elections three months ago expecting and easy victory. the leader must now build a coalition after a strong showing by a new party. he is expected to keep his job. much of the u.s. experiencing the coldest temperature and two years. four deaths are blamed on the cold snap. entergy nuclear manually shut it down on monday. it was the second shut down this month and the six in the past two years. those are your headlines. back to melissa and lori. lori: many thanks. secretary of state hillary clinton defending the response and benghazi. >> we were misled that there were supposedly protest. that was easily -- >> the american people could have known that within days. >> with all due respect, the fact is we had four dead americans. what difference, at this point, does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened and do everything we can to prevent it from ever happening again, senator. lori: secretary clinton will face members about the house in about 40 minutes. it is time for lou dobbs now. l
control -- neil: running with their tail between their legs, running scaredded, lost the election, doesn't mean they lost the backbone or resolve or whatever used to be in their dna that showed some discipline. they lost that now, and seeded it to a president who talked up entitlements in the speech, talked the merits of government spending, strongly as ronald reagan did, the dangers of government spending, and these might be new times. how do they challenge them? >> well, again, i think they challenged them by getting back on to the floor, get a budget, force a budget to be out there, debate the budget, put the budgets up for across the board vote. make the press deal with the realities of our nation and the size of the government and the tradeoff decisions that must be made, but let the house right the narrative. neil: the media won't play that fight fairly, and republicans, in order to complete that fight, must, like, alcoholics at an aa meeting, come out, stand up, and say, look, look, we -- >> all right -- neil: spent too much and learned the error of of our ways. take it from us. i
on the foreign relations committee, his work with dick lugar to ensure free elections in the philippines, his work with bill frist on aids in africa, his work as chairman of the new start treaty and his very public and successful diplomatic interventions in afghanistan, pakistan and sudan. i think one day historians will judge his senate years in temperatures terms of his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many recognize senator ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, john has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or government but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said, it's the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he's been working quietly to help a father from newton, massachusetts, colin bauer, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he's been to egypt since then and every time colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting.
is the first african-american elected. he used language interesting to me. that we owe a lot to our founding documents. he referred a lot to the founding documents, not a lot to the founding documents. the founding fathers owned slaves. >> a process ever since. let's play a little bit about what he said. i think the constant looking back to the constitution was a very strong theme in his speech yesterday. let's play that. >> we hold these truths to be self-evident. that all men are creating equal. that they are endowed by their creator with certainly unalienable rights, and among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. >> and with that, he sort of launched into not an olive branch, he launched into here is the preparation for the fight ahead for the next four years. is that how you saw it? >> i saw it almost a campaign speech for 2014. we need congress, need to get this thing done, yeah. i saw it that way. and very interesting. the republicans and democrats are both in this death embrace. they each have their own constituents, throwing a lot of money at them on both sides. rep
calmed down the markets. what we now need is political stability. i think the italian election is one thing and the second thing we need in europe more than anything else is -- >> yeah. we thought stabilizing the crisis in terms of the bond spreads playing out was hard. getting growth into europe looks to be an almost impossible challenge. unemployment rate for spain, 26%. really weak pmi out of france, as well, yesterday. >> we need several things. one is structural austerity at home. through austerity, i believe you can get growth. secondly, we need to continue liberalizing the market. thirdly, we need more world trade. but we should be looking at a foreseeable furp, or slower growth in europe than russia, china or the united states. >> let's talk about austerity. austerity when you're part of a single currency, if you're in the uk and you're looking at austerity, you can let your currency weaken, you can control central bank money. can't really do that in europe. and the imf has admitted the multiply they got totally wrong in countries with bailouts. >> yeah. i think that's the tou
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)